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New bylaws for signs and electric vehicle parking

New bylaws for signs and electric vehicle parking

Councils may have to create bylaws to bring effect to recent amendments to the Land Transport Rules. The Land Transport Amendment (Road User) Rule 2004 has been amended as part of the Land Transport Rule: Regulatory Stewardship (Omnibus) Amendment 2018.

A New Zealand Construction Sector Accord signals long-term commitment between government and industry to collaborate on work areas for a healthy construction sector.
It focuses on the key priorities of expanding workforce capability and capacity, rebalancing risk, improving health and safety, and boosting supply of affordable and durable housing.
Civil Contractors New Zealand CE Peter Silcock called for the accord to be extended to the relationship between local government and contractors, in addition to head contractors and subcontractors.
He said the Accord will complement the creation of the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, with the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission/Te Waihanga Bill currently under consultation.

The Omnibus consultation enables a diverse range of minor changes to several Land Transport Rules all at once, instead of consulting on each rule individually.

The final Amendment Rules have been signed by Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter and will come into effect on June 1 this year. They are particularly pertinent to enforcement for signs and electric vehicle parking

Amendments to this rule mean it is now an offence to turn into or enter a road where a traffic sign prohibits this, and to park a non-electric vehicle in an electric vehicle charging space.

For the 2018 Omnibus Rule, the Associate Transport Minister made about 80 changes across 15 Land Transport Rules.

The changes in the latest Omnibus are necessary for a variety of reasons – from clarifying requirements to support enforcement or amending requirements to reflect current technologies.

Construction Sector Accord

A New Zealand Construction Sector Accord signals long-term commitment between government and industry to collaborate on work areas for a healthy construction sector.
It focuses on the key priorities of expanding workforce capability and capacity, rebalancing risk, improving health and safety, and boosting supply of affordable and durable housing.
Civil Contractors New Zealand CE Peter Silcock called for the accord to be extended to the relationship between local government and contractors, in addition to head contractors and subcontractors.
He said the Accord will complement the creation of the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, with the New Zealand Infrastructure Commission/Te Waihanga Bill currently under consultation.

Environmental snapshot a helpful tool for councils

LGNZ has welcomed a new report on the state of the country’s environment, saying it will help councils to focus their efforts where they can make the biggest difference. The Ministry for the Environment (MfE), using Statistics NZ data, has compiled the Environment Aotearoa 2019 Synthesis Report using data largely sourced from regional councils.
Produced every three years, The MfE’s synthesis reports provide a yardstick for the state of the environment across a number of areas, including ecosystems and biodiversity, climate change, land-use change and freshwater and marine.
LGNZ regional sector deputy chair Rachel Reese says, “As the report makes clear, one of the major challenges we have to overcome in the environmental space is improving the quality of the information at our disposal.
“Too often we find that there’s missing data, limited knowledge of the effects humans are having on the environment, or an incomplete understanding of this process.”
Download the report from:
bit.ly/MfE_EnvironmentAotearoa


This article was first published in the June 2019 issue of NZ Local Government Magazine.

 

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